[NEW] AIS Receiver – SARCNET | ais router – POLLICELEE

ais router: นี่คือโพสต์ที่เกี่ยวข้องกับหัวข้อนี้

Parts List

Your AIS receiver will require the following items:

  • 162MHz AIS vertical antenna. See above for the simplest design or here for other ideas.

  • Antenna mast. High enough to mount the antenna within line of sight of ships.

  • Coaxial cable (50 Ohm, e.g. RG-58) from the antenna to the AIS receiver, with an SMA connector

  • (Only needed for poor reception areas). See: www.uputronics.com

    .

    AIS Filtered RF Preamplifer – 162MHz(Only needed for poor reception areas). See:

  • Weatherproof, non-metallic (for Wi-Fi access), enclosure for mounting the hardware

  • Raspberry Pi (RPi) single board computer. Any version: 0,1,2,3,4, model B or B+. See:

    www.raspberrypi.org.

  • USB Hub Hat with

    micro USB joiner (Only required for RPi0). See: www.waveshare.com

    .

  • USB Wi-Fi dongle to suit your home Wi-Fi router (Not required if your RPi already has Wi-Fi)

  • USB RTL-SDR dongle (TCXO 1ppm or better). See:

    www.rtl-sdr.com

    .

  • USB extension cable, 10cm

    (Not required for RPi0 with Hub Hat)

  • USB DC/DC converter (

    12V to 5V, 2A with USB micro connector) and a DC Adapter (12V, 1A) – For outside AIS Receiver mounting; or

  • USB plug pack (5V 2A) with USB micro connector – For inside AIS Receiver mounting
  • DC Cable, twin core as required to connect the DC Adapter (inside) to the DC/DC converter (outside)

  • 8GB SDHC card (RPi1) or 8GB Micro SDHC card (RPi0,2,3,4)

  • Raspbian Buster with our latest AIS Receiver software image (Version 2.00 – Released 11 May 2020). See below.

Note: Components and cables should be readily available locally or search for their name on eBay.

Create your SDHC Card Image

To simplify the installation process, we have prepared a complete, working image of the Raspbian Buster operating system together with the open-source rtl_ais and aisdispatcher software already installed and enabled as services. The image file is compressed, but will still require a large download and sufficient free space on your PC to unzip it: At least 10GB in total.

Request a link to our AIS receiver software image here

and follow the software installation instructions below

.

To install our AIS receiver software image do the following on a PC:

  1. Download the

    zip file (650MB) using the link provided

  2. Unzip the zip file to an img file (8GB)

  3. Download Win32DiskImager (12MB) using the link provided

  4. Install Win32DiskImager

  5. Insert an 8GB SDHC or 8GB Micro SDHC card into the PC (Note: A USB SD card adapter may be necessary)

  6. Start Win32DiskImager

  7. Select the image file and the SDHC card above. Select Write.

  8. Eject the SDHC card from the PC when finished

  9. You can then delete the zip and img files from your PC if desired

Configure your Raspberry Pi

Your Raspberry Pi will have to be configured for the first time using a hard-wired keyboard and monitor. You need to enter your own login password, your WiFi router access credentials and your localization information as follows:

  1. Power off the Raspberry Pi

  2. Insert the SDHC card into the Raspberry Pi

  3. For a RPi1 connect a powered USB hub
  4. Connect a USB Wi-Fi Dongle (only for RPis without a Wi-Fi adapter)
  5. Connect a USB keyboard

  6. Connect

    an HDMI monitor – You may need an HDMI to micro HDMI adapter

  7. Do not connect USB RTL-SDR dongle just yet
  8. Power up the Raspberry Pi using a USB Plug Pack or USB DC/DC Converter connected to a 12V DC Adapter
  9. Log in:

    1. Type: pi

    2. Type: raspberry

  10. Type: sudo raspi-config. Select and configure the following options for your installation:

    1. Change your User Password (Very, Very Important!)

    2. Network Options

      1. Enter your Wi-Fi SSID and Passphrase for your Wi-Fi Router
    3. Localization Options

      1. Locale

      2. Timezone

      3. Keyboard Layout

      4. Wi-Fi Country

  11. When connected to the Internet, upgrade the operating system:
    1. Type: sudo apt-get update
    2. Type: sudo apt-get upgrade -y
  12. To discover the IP Address of your RPi so you can log-in later:

    1. Type: hostname -I
  13. Shutdown your RPi:
    1. Type: sudo shutdown now
  14. Power down your RPi

  15. Connect

    the

    USB RTL-SDR dongle

  16. Connect your 162MHz antenna to the

    USB RTL-SDR dongle

  17. Power up the RPi

Calibrate your AIS Receiver

The operating frequency of the

USB RTL-SDR

Dongle’s internal Temperature Controlled Crystal Oscillator (TCXO)

may not be precisely on frequency, depending on its quality and other factors. However, you can u

se the RPi clock to calibrate the RTL-AIS service to account for any frequency offset. Note: The frequency offset is measured in Parts Per Million (PPM). Note: For 1PPM RTL-SDRs this step is hardly necessary as the frequency would only be off by +/- 162Hz.

Do the following on the Raspberry Pi:

  1. Login:

    1. Type: pi

    2. Type: Your password

  2. Stop the RTL AIS service and run the RTL test

    1. Type: sudo systemctl stop rtl_ais.service

    2. Type: rtl_test -p60

    3. Wait until the cumulative error value (in PPM) remains more-or-less the same for three consecutive minutes

    4. Note the last

      cumulative error value (in PPM). As shown below it is

      -3 PPM in this case.

pi@AIS:~ $ rtl_test -p60

Found 1 device(s):

 0:  Realtek, RTL2838UHIDIR, SN: 00000001

Using device 0: Generic RTL2832U OEM

Detached kernel driver

Found Rafael Micro R820T tuner

Supported gain values (29): 0.0 0.9 1.4 2.7 3.7 7.7 8.7 12.5 14.4 15.7 16.6 19.7 20.7 22.9 25.4 28.0 29.7 32.8 33.8 36.4 37.2 38.6 40.2 42.1 43.4 43.9 44.5 48.0 49.6

[R82XX] PLL not locked!

Sampling at 2048000 S/s.

Reporting PPM error measurement every 60 seconds…

Press ^C after a few minutes.

Reading samples in async mode…

Allocating 15 zero-copy buffers

lost at least 64 bytes

real sample rate: 2048000 current PPM: 0 cumulative PPM: 0

real sample rate: 2047993 current PPM: -3 cumulative PPM: -1

real sample rate: 2047989 current PPM: -5 cumulative PPM: -3

real sample rate: 2047994 current PPM: -3 cumulative PPM: -3

real sample rate: 2047995 current PPM: -2 cumulative PPM: -3

3. Update the RTL AIS service

with the required correction value in PPM

(+3 in this case)

, which is the opposite of the error value in PPM (-3 in this case) determined above.

a. Type: sudo nano /etc/systemd/system/rtl_ais.service

b. Change: ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/rtl_ais -p 0 to

ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/rtl_ais -p 3

c. Type: Ctrl-O to save the changes and Ctrl-X to exit the editor

4. Reload and restart the RTL AIS service with the new changes

5. Type: sudo

systemctl daemon-reload

6. Type: sudo

systemctl restart rtl_ais

Register your AIS Receiver

By default, the AIS receiver software will upload your AIS station data only to the Pocket Mariner, Ship Finder and Vessel Finder AIS servers as an anonymous user. To upload to the AIS Hub and Marine Traffic AIS servers y

ou will have to register with them to get a unique

Upload IP Address and Port Number

for your AIS station. These AIS servers also provide statistics for your AIS station. You can also register with the Vessel Finder AIS server if you want statistics for your AIS station too. Some AIS servers provide significant benefits to registered AIS station operators like free premium membership for the use of their AIS data and AIS station upload statistics, area coverage, online availability and email alerts.

Since AIS servers don’t all share your data, please upload to as many as possible. It will make the world a safer place for vessels!

Here are the links to some AIS service providers including their IP Address and Port Numbers for anonymous upload:

  • AIS Hub

    :

    http://www.aishub.net/join-us

    (Requires registration for upload and monitoring)

  • Marine Traffic

    :

    https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/users/register/1/12

    (Requires registration for upload and monitoring)

  • Pocket Mariner: http://pocketmariner.com/ais-ship-tracking/cover-your-area/ (54.225.113.225:5322 – Upload only)
  • Ship Finder: https://shipfinder.co/about/coverage/ (

    109.200.19.151:

    4001 – Upload only

    )

  • Vessel Finder

    :

    https://stations.vesselfinder.com/become-partner (195.201.71.220:5964 –

    Requires registration for monitoring

    )

To add new AIS Server Upload IP Addresses and Port Numbers to the defaults for the

AIS Dispatcher service

:

  1. Stop and edit the AIS Dispatcher service
    1. Type:

      sudo systemctl stop aisdispatcher

    2. Type: sudo nano /etc/systemd/system/aisdispatcher.service
  2. Add

    each new Upload

    IP Address and Port Number (Format: AAA.BBB.CCC.DDD:PPPP) to the end of the line below, each separated by a comma and with NO spaces.

  3. ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/aisdispatcher -u -g -h 127.0.0.1 -p 10110 -H 54.225.113.225:5322,

    109.200.19.151:4001,195.201.71.220:5964

  4. Type: Ctrl-O to save the changes and Ctrl-X to exit the editor

  5. Reload and restart the changed AIS Dispatcher service:
    1. Type: sudo systemctl daemon-reload

    2. Type:

      sudo systemctl restart aisdispatcher

Monitor your AIS Receiver

You can securely log into your AIS receiver over your Wi-Fi network to check its operation from another Wi-Fi enabled PC.

  1. Use your AIS Receiver’s IP address discovered earlier (or check your Wi-Fi router’s DHCP leases to find it).

  2. Open a terminal window
    1. Type: ssh pi@<Your AIS Receiver’s IP Address>

    2. Type: <Your password>
  3. Display the AIS data being received in real-time as raw NMEA sentences

    1. Type: journalctl -u aisdispatcher.service -f

pi@AIS:~ $ journalctl -u aisdispatcher.service -f

— Logs begin at Fri 2020-05-15 19:39:48 AEST. —

May 16 01:26:05 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,18JslT0014bGF;5bEibtLqqh0D1A,0*3D

May 16 01:27:12 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,4@4k1EQvAGgK;:Etkmb:JM7P00S:,0*10

May 16 01:27:45 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,18JslT0014bGEFkbEnwtCIm:00ST,0*75

May 16 01:28:03 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,17OetM5P18:GEFwbEp4<=?v80D0U,0*57

May 16 01:28:32 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,4@4k1EQvAGgLO:Etkmb:JM7P0L1:,0*7D

May 16 01:28:34 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,3815F:Uwh0bGHugbG4U:FWW40r7b,0*48

May 16 01:29:12 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,4@4k1EQvAGgM;:Etkmb:JM7P0H7=,0*0D

May 16 01:29:24 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,17OetM5P0w:GDcWbEt>LEwvj08><,0*1A

May 16 01:29:44 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,17P4895P15:GD;obEwB<8gwJ0@JB,0*7E

May 16 01:30:03 AIS aisdispatcher[438]: !AIVDM,1,1,,B,17OetM5P11:GDG7bEv6<E?v80<0U,0*1A

b. Type:

Ctrl-C

to exit

However, to verify that your data is being uploaded to an AIS server you have to log into it and check your upload statistics – if provided.

Install your AIS Receiver

Reconfigure the AIS receiver for stand-alone operation, install it in the enclosure and mount it as follows:

  1. Disconnect the USB keyboard,

    HDMI monitor and USB hub, if used

  2. Assembe the RPi, USB RTL-SDR dongle and 12V to 5V 2A micro USB DC/DC converter in the enclosure

  3. Connect the 162MHz antenna via the 50 Ohm coaxial cable and an SMA connector to the USB RTL-SDR

  4. Optionally connect an inline 162MHz AIS Filtered Preamp to amplify the AIS signals and filter out local radio frequency interfrence.   

  5. Connect the 12V DC Adapter via 12V DC Cable to the 12V to 5V 2A micro USB DC/DC converter.

  6. Mount the enclosure as close to the 162MHz Antenna as possible to reduce coaxial line losses if required. However, inside installations with short lengths of coaxial cable may also be acceptable.

Operate your AIS Receiver

Operating an AIS Receiver station is easy. Just

switch it on,

let it connect to the Internet and it will receive and upload AIS traffic to the AIS Servers, 24/7.

  1. Make a backup copy of the RPi SD Card using Win32diskimager.

  2. Check the operation of the AIS Receiver on a regular basis by monitoring it (as above).

  3. Check your AIS Servers. Some provide useful AIS Receiver station statistics and on-line maps.

Check the Performance of your AIS Receiver

The AIS receiver will work well on any version of Raspberry Pi with WiFi access – either using the built-in WiFi transceiver or an add-on USB WiFi dongle. Expect the rtl_ais application to run at the following CPU throughput levels:

  • 90% CPU on a RPi1
  • 66% CPU on an RPi0
  • 23% CPU on and RPi2

More information

For more information and credit for the open-source code used in this project please see:

  • A simple AIS tuner and generic dual-frequency FM demodulator by D. Giardini: rtl-ais

  • An AIS data forwarding utility by AISHub: aisdispatcher

[Update] Ais Decoder | ais router – POLLICELEE

and 50 Binary
Messages

The decoder will decode all
the NMEA

VDM or VDO

content
of
all 27 AIS message types including !AIVDM, !BSVDM and
!ABVDM,
The decoder has been tested on an XP PC, and believe it
should work on
all Windows PC’s after 98. Other users report it works on
Vista, Win 7,
Win 7-64, Win 8, Win 8.1 and Linux (Wine).

Lower Manhattan

Immingham UK Docks


Introduction

Ais Decoder
accepts
AIS data from an AIS Receiver, the Internet or a Local
Network
connection, decodes the data and presents the decoded data
in a form
suitable for display and analysis by mapping program (eg
Google Earth
or Google Maps), or for analysis using Excel, or by a
database (eg
MySql).

Main
Features

Input:
Serial or USB from AIS receiver, UDP or TCP
from network,
Log File

Input Filter:
AIS Message type, DAC, FI, ID, MMSI

Output:
Display, File, FTP, UDP

Output Frequency

As received or at Scheduled intervals

Output Filter:
Lat/Lon or any other decoded field

Output Formats:
Text, CSV, HTML, XML, KML, KMZ, NMEA

Self-extracting
installation
file, including help

PDF Help Manual

AIS

AIS is primarily transmitted by ships
for
collision avoidance. Ships over 200 tons must carry an AIS
transponder
which both transmits and receives AIS data, enabling vessels
to see the
speed and course (and other information) of vessels within around 20 miles
of one
another. It is also used by the Coast Guard and port
authorities to
monitor vessel movements. Other uses are becoming more common,
such as
Virtual Navigation Aids, weather and sea state reporting,
control of
inland waterways such as canals and locks. Anyone with a
suitable
receiver can receive this data.

AisDecoder Specification

There is a comprehensive Help file
distributed
with the installation file
There is also a PDF extraction of this file here.

How AIS data is Encoded

AIS data is encapsulated within the Marine Standard NMEA
protocol,
which defines Standands
for
communication
between
wired
electonic
ship
devices.
NMEA
defines
many
different
sentences,
two
of
which
are
normally
used
for
containing AIS data named !AIVDM
and !AIVDO. The content of both these sentences are identical
(!AIVDM
is transmitted, !AIVDO is on board).

   
Transmission

For transmission the !AIVDM sentences are sent in individual
packets
using a system called TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access). If
two
transmitters sent data at exactly the same time, a receiver
with range
of both transmitters would pick up garbled packets. TDMA
organises AIS
transmitters in such a way that each AIS transmitter does not
try and
transmit their own data packets at exactly the same time as
another
transmitter within range. Each packet transmitted lasts for
exactly
26.670 milliseconds and is transmitted on a VHF channel within
the
marine radio band. The transmission of one packet is called a
slot,
during which time exactly 168 bits of data can be sent. If a
NMEA
sentence contains more than 168 bits, multiple slots are used,
the
complete message being re-assembled by the AIS receiver. This
splitting
of a AIS message into packets for transmission and the
re-assembly by
the receiver is transparent to AisDecoder, however the control
of
the slots uses specific AIS messages, which are decoded.
   

NMEA
Sentences

NMEA sentences are split into words separated by a comma, and
have a
maximum length of 80 characters.
eg   

!AIVDM,1,1,,B,13PRrB0000OvbS@NhA9=oPbr0<0u,0*58

The first word !AIVDM is the name of the sentence, the last 2
characters are the checksum.
The AIS
Payload is
the 6th word –

13PRrB0000OvbS@NhA9=oPbr0<0u

As the maximum
size of
the whole sentence is 80 characters, the payload can be no
longer than
51 characters, and may be shorter.
Because the permitted characters in a NMEA sentence are a
subset of the
8-bit ASCII character set, and the payload must be able to
contain all
bits, each 8 bit character in the payload can only represent 6
bits of
data. Every 6 bits of AIS data has to be encoded into one 8
bit ASCII
character, prior to transmission. One NMEA AIS sentence can
only
contain a maximum of 306 bits.
If an AIS message is longer than 306 bits, each AIS message
must be
split into “multi-part” NMEA sentences. Words 2,3 and 4 are
the no of
parts, this part and a part id. The 5th word is the AIS radio
channel
which has been used for transmission.
   

AIS Messages


AIS messages are contained entirely in the payload (6th) word
of a NMEA
sentence or in the case of multi-part messages in multiple
payloads,
after re-assembly by the decoder. The messages, of which there
are 27
basic types, are split into separate fields. Each field
contains a
number of bits. These fields are also encoded as they could
represent
numerical data (eg speed) or textual data (eg vessel’s name)
or require
conversion from a numeric code to a meaningful description (eg
type of
vessel where 50 = Pilot Vessel). AisDecoder decodes around
1500
separate fields.
The first 3 fields of AIS messages are always Message type,
Repeat
indicator and MMSI.
    Binary
AIS
Messages


The first sub level is by Designated Area Code (DAC) for example
where DAC=1 is for
international messages.
The next sub level is by Function Identifier (FI) for example
where 2 =
Vessel/Lock scheduling
The next sub level is by Identifier (ID) for example where 1 =
Lockage
order

Sample
Displays and Outputs

NMEA Input (Time Stamp
Appended)


Summary
Display

Detail Display

Google
Earth
Display

HTML Browser Display

You can output any message
fields – this
is a simple example

Source of HTML Browser Display


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<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">


<

html

><

head

>
<

title

>Ais Decoder</

title

>
<

meta

http-equiv

=

"Content-Type"

content

=

"text/html; charset=iso-8859-1"

>
<

style

type

=

"text/css"

>
<!--
.html_head {font-size: 10px; color: #000000; font-family: arial, sans-serif; }
.content_header {color: #ff0000; }
-->
</

style

>
</

head

>
<

body

>
<

table

class

=

"html_head"

>
<

tr

class

=

"content_header"

><

td

>Name</

td

><

td

>Position</

td

><

td

>Course</

td

><

td

>Speed</

td

></

tr

>
<

tr

><

td

>PUCCINI</

td

><

td

>54&

#176;

4.3101&

apos;

N, 0&

#176;

19.6000&

apos;

E</

td

><

td

>165.0</

td

><

td

>11.4</

td

></

tr

>
<

tr

><

td

>KEY FIGHTER</

td

><

td

>53&

#176;

38.0090&

apos;

N, 0&

#176;

11.3053&

apos;

W</

td

><

td

>190.0</

td

><

td

>0.0</

td

></

tr

>
<

tr

><

td

>CITY OF WESTMINSTER</

td

><

td

>53&

#176;

44.7599&

apos;

N, 0&

#176;

17.6800&

apos;

W</

td

><

td

>142.0</

td

><

td

>0.1</

td

></

tr

>
</

table

></

body

></

html

>


Google Maps XML Display Simple Example


XML Example Source of Google Maps Display

XML Example Source of Google Maps Display


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wrap
lines)
 

<markers>
<marker lat=”53.648310″ lon=”-0.208423″ name=”FS
PHILIPPINE”
dx=”0.000″ dy=”0.000″ type=”Tanker-carrying DG,HS,MP,IMO haz
or
pollutant X”
ais=”228320800!9310305!FMDU!IMMINGHAM!0222:0930!0.0!79.0!!Under
way
sailing (Rule 25)!140!23!8.8!22/02/2011 17:40:57!Ship and
Voyage
Report”/>
<marker lat=”54.035500″ lon=”0.206833″ name=”” dx=”0.000″
dy=”0.000″
type=”” ais=”250000962!!!!:!13.3!135.0!!Under way using engine
(Rule
23(a) or Rule 25(e))!!!!22/02/2011 17:40:57!”/>
<marker lat=”53.738860″ lon=”-0.260938″ name=”” dx=”0.000″
dy=”0.000″ type=”” ais=”304970000!!!!:!0.0!285.0!!Under way
using
engine (Rule 23(a) or Rule 25(e))!!!!22/02/2011
17:41:03!”/>
<marker lat=”54.441670″ lon=”0.698505″ name=”” dx=”0.000″
dy=”0.000″
type=”” ais=”419504000!!!!:!11.0!139.0!!Under way using engine
(Rule
23(a) or Rule 25(e))!!!!22/02/2011 17:40:59!”/>
</markers>

Google Maps
KML Server
Simple Example


CSV Output All Fields – File

(Browser
may
wrap
lines)
23/02/2011
10:43:36,,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,235475000,235,0,0,0.0,0,-0.294167,53.746000,39.0,272,33,0,0,0,0,0,4,1394
23/02/2011
10:43:36,,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,235475000,235,0,0,0.0,0,-0.294167,53.746000,39.0,272,33,0,0,0,0,0,4,1394
23/02/2011
10:43:36,AMANDINE,!AIVDM,2,2,4,5,0,253047000,253,1,9424871,LXAM,AMANDINE,71,146,49,195,15,15,30,1,02,23,07,00,7.2,KILLINGHOLME,0,0
23/02/2011
10:43:36,,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,232079000,232,0,0,15.8,0,0.257683,53.836980,335.0,332,38,0,0,1,0,0,0,2253
23/02/2011
10:43:36,CORAGGIO,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,247188200,247,0,0,0.1,0,-0.230233,53.666580,144.0,144,35,0,0,0,0,0,1,10,43
23/02/2011
10:43:37,,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,232003329,232,0,-128,3.4,0,0.625418,53.970200,20.0,511,38,0,0,0,0,0,7,18
23/02/2011 10:43:37,AMUR
2524,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,273324000,273,0,-127,6.7,0,0.452878,54.147750,150.0,156,39,0,0,0,0,0,0,2294
23/02/2011
10:43:37,,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,236263000,236,0,16,13.7,0,0.400488,54.035790,324.0,323,38,0,0,1,0,0,2,1450
23/02/2011 10:43:37,SIGAS
CHAMPION,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,564120000,564,0,0,11.4,0,-0.137148,54.574670,327.0,326,39,0,0,0,0,0,5,1
23/02/2011
10:43:37,,!AIVDM,1,1,,1,0,308583000,308,0,-127,2.5,0,0.548317,54.574230,175.0,176,40,0,0,1,0,1,1,24,60


CSV Output All Fields – Display

(for
clarity
the
first
2
columns
are
removed)



CSV Output All Fields – Excel

(for
clarity
the
first
2
columns
are
removed)



CSV Decoded Output Selected Fields – File

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may
wrap
lines)

247188200,CORAGGIO,53°
39.9950′
N,0°
13.8140′
W,0.0,144.0
253047000,,53° 40.1143′ N,0° 13.9960′ W,0.0,324.0
253310000,,53° 39.9479′ N,0° 13.8860′ W,0.0,144.0
273324000,AMUR 2524,54° 11.4175′ N,0° 24.2075′ E,6.7,148.0
308282000,TOISA DEFIANT,54° 15.6109′ N,0° 19.2650′
E,11.1,335.0
308583000,OCEAN SPRITE,54° 35.5371′ N,0° 32.7160′
E,2.0,176.0
319402000,STOLT SHEARWATER,54° 2.4300′ N,0° 26.7200′
E,10.1,147.0
477720300,STAR SEA BULKER,53° 38.2599′ N,0° 11.7100′
W,0.0,33.0
518408000,SWAN DIANA,54° 11.1028′ N,0° 0.0398′ E,7.7,316.0
564120000,SIGAS CHAMPION,54° 30.0817′ N,0° 3.4236′
W,11.1,328.0

CSV Output Selected Fields – Display
CSV Output Selected Fields – Excel

SPNMEA input file

!AIVDM,1,1,,A,13;5<D001L00<t8NwVI5ATEF08Kc,0*7A

$GPZDA,123047,14,08,2010,+00,00*6E

!AIVDM,1,1,,A,13Pi8L0P00023hjNrlsA8?wP0<0F,0*02

!AIVDM,1,1,,A,14WU7D0OiqOwteBNw@5L`awP0D0D,0*78

$GPZDA,123048,14,08,2010,+00,00*61

!AIVDM,1,1,,A,14Uumt0Oi:00GQ0O;Ab6FTuR0L0>,0*36

!AIVDM,1,1,,A,14QsCa002Gww>8LO1T6<A9uP0D0A,0*64

!AIVDM,2,1,1,A,58UQ<802@Vj9TaIWV20pE@PE8h4pB1@T@F22220l2Hk8865E0<Tm<p8888888888,0*46

!AIVDM,2,2,1,A,8888880,2*25

$GPZDA,123049,14,08,2010,+00,00*60

SPNMEA input file, File
Output All
Fields – Display

(for
clarity
the
first
2
columns
are
removed)

SPNMEA input file, CSV Output Selected Fields – Display

SPNMEA input file, CSV Output Selected Fields – Excel


ลองเล่น 5G Router จาก AIS ใส่ซิม TRUE ใช้ง่ายมากแค่เสียบซิม และเสียบปลั๊ก เปิด จบเลย


บ้านที่ไม่มีFiber คอนโดที่เน็ตเต็ม หรืองานถ่ายทอดสดนอกสถานที่ ไปออกบูธนอกสถานที่ หรือทำสำนักงานชั่วคราว หาเน็ตลำบากใช้ 5G Router สะดวกมากแค่ใส่ซิม เสียบปลั๊ก เปิดเครื่อง ต่อเข้าไวไฟ เสียบสาย Lan ได้ 4 ช่อง เท่าที่ได้ลองได้ทั้งค่ายแดง และค่ายเขียว ยังไม่ได้ลองค่ายฟ้า
ดูคลิปลองเล่น เทสสปีด ได้เลย
https://www.thaiload.com/2021/10/06/5grouterais/
ลอง 5G Router ZLT X21G จาก AIS มาลองใส่ ซิม TRUE ใช้งานง่ายมากแค่ใส่ซิมก็ใช้ได้เลย

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูเพิ่มเติม

ลองเล่น 5G Router จาก AIS ใส่ซิม TRUE ใช้ง่ายมากแค่เสียบซิม และเสียบปลั๊ก เปิด จบเลย

วิธีเปลี่ยนชื่อไวไฟ ais ผ่านมือถือง่ายๆไม่ต้องตามช่าง


_________________

ais,ais fibre,ais pocket wifi,เน็ตบ้าน ais,ais speed test,เปลี่ยนชื่อ,สอนเปลี่ยนชื่อ,เปลี่ยนชื่อwifi,เปลี่ยนชื่อ wifi,wifi ais,โปร5 ais,เปลี่ยนชื่อrouter,ais fiber,เปลี่ยนรหัสไวไฟ,วิธีเปลี่ยนชื่อwifi,เปลี่ยนชื่อ wireless,สมัคร 5g ais,เปลี่ยนรหัสไวไฟ3bb,วิธีเปลี่ยนชื่อ wifi 3bb,วิธีเปลี่ยนรหัสไวไฟ,ais 4g home wifi,เปลี่ยนรหัสไวไฟมือถือ,เปลี่ยน​รหัสผ่าน​ไวไฟ,วิธีสมัคร5g ais,ตั้งค่า ais fibre,เปลี่ยนชื่อเปลี่ยนรหัส mi wifi

วิธีเปลี่ยนชื่อไวไฟ ais ผ่านมือถือง่ายๆไม่ต้องตามช่าง

Huawei router ais fibre


Huawei router ais fibre

Huawei router ais fibre

How to Set-up AIS pilot plug wifi


How to Setup AIS pilot plug wifi

Buy here:
https://shp.ee/ge7qbg6

How to Set-up AIS pilot plug wifi

Relational Databases (AIS Ch 4)


Table of Contents:
00:00 Relational Databases
00:05 Learning Objectives
00:55 What Is a Database?
01:59 Advantages of Databases
02:58 Database Users and Designers
03:40 Database Design
04:40 DBMS Languages
05:30 Relational Database
05:55 Conceptual View Example
06:01 Relational Data Tables
06:04 Conceptual View Example
06:13 Relational Data Tables
06:45 Relational Data Tables
06:45 Relational Data Tables
06:46 Conceptual View Example
06:51 Relational Data Tables
06:54 Relational Data Tables
07:51 Why Have a Set of Related Tables?
08:04 Relational Database Design Rules
09:22 Queries
09:42 Creating the Query
10:00 Query Answer
10:08 Creating the Query
10:10 Query Answer
10:16 Creating the Query
10:31 Query Answer
10:33 Key Terms

Relational Databases (AIS Ch 4)

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูบทความเพิ่มเติมในหมวดหมู่General news

ขอบคุณมากสำหรับการดูหัวข้อโพสต์ ais router

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