[NEW] Game of Thrones Season 4 Finale Recap: I Have Always Been Your Son | game of thrones season 4 – POLLICELEE

game of thrones season 4: นี่คือโพสต์ที่เกี่ยวข้องกับหัวข้อนี้

And now our watching is ended (for now).

Last night’s season finale, written by showrunners David Benoioff and D.B. Weiss and directed by Alex Graves, was titled “The Children.” And while a wee wittle Child of the Forest did, in fact, make a fiery appearance, it was the children we’ve been following for 40 hours now that were the heart of the episode. The relationships between generations has always been one of the show’s major themes, and used it in resonant ways throughout the hour — and not just at that one big moment, which we’ll get to anon.

The Free Folk may not put a lot of stock in rules and rulers, but they do believe in tribes and lineage, just as the “civilized” people of Westeros do. Following the watchmen’s Pyrrhic victory at Castle Black, Jon and Mance Rayder sit down for a tense parley and Mance notes — halfway approvingly — that Jon’s men killed Mag the Mighty, a giant who was the king of his people, with a bloodline that stretched back for generations. Jon retorts that Grenn, the man who killed Mag and was killed by the giant in turn, came from a farm.

As the two tired soldiers share a “proper Northern drink,” it’s clear how, in different circumstances, they could have been close. The big, lordly man has more than a bit of Ned Stark in him — not least a shared inability to bend one’s internal rules for the sake of safety or convenience. Mance’s drive as a ruler comes from a fatherly need to protect; as he tells Jon, he’s not here to conquer, he just wants to shepherd “his people” to safety and some rest. (Of course, he let his people slaughter a bunch of innocent villagers on their way south, but I’m not here to question anyone’s parenting techniques, particularly on long road trips.) When Stannis’s men arrive, streaming into the frame in those crisply beautiful grid formations — which the camera returns to multiple times, underlining the fact that it’s rigid, geometric-thinking Stannis who manages to take down those free-loving hippie anarchists — Mance puts his money where his mouth is and surrenders. But in Ned Stark-y fashion, he won’t kneel. Later, at Castle Black, a captive Tormund will tell Jon that he’s been with the Free Folk for too long and that he, too, will never be “a kneeler” again.

So Jon now has two father figures, Mance and Ned, who shape his sense of the world. But with all he’s seen, he can only be his own man: When he meets Stannis and reveals his parentage — earning the dour man’s trust and respect — Stannis asks him what his father would do with Mance, and Jon’s answer draws its weight equally from Ned’s lessons and his own experience. Mance could have tortured or killed him at any time, but he didn’t; Ned would have taken him prisoner, Jon says. And if his father had seen what Jon has seen, he would also burn their dead — immediately.

Across the Narrow Sea, the orphan Daenerys is having a somewhat harder time coming into her own. An orderly, organized fighting pattern may have brought down the wildlings, but Meereen is messy, and the neat social system Dany has been trying to impose on the cities of Slavers Bay has been straining for some time now, as more and more citizens step forward to request something the conquering queen didn’t foresee. Last night, it was an old man who wanted Dany’s permission to return to servitude, which brought him not only protection (in the mess halls and barracks Dany has set up, just as in Westeros, the strong seize any opportunity to prey on the weak) but also the more rarefied tiers of human needs: love, belonging, the respect of others. Dany makes a spur-of-the-moment adjustment to her ethical framework and allows the man to enter back into service for a year, saying, almost like she believes it, that freedom means being able to choose. Her father figure, Barristan Selmy, points out that the masters will soon take advantage of this loophole, but what’s a girl queen to do?

My gut churned as the second man approached Dany’s throne and it became clear what was in that bundle of rags he was crying over. A few weeks ago, in a similar situation, we were spared the sight of a charred child’s corpse; last night, however, we were not so lucky. The trade Daenerys was forced to make — locking up her “children” in penance for having robbed the man of his — had a brutal symmetry to it. It’s as if Dany, unable to make clean, uncomplicated rules stick with her people, punishes herself with the same.

Or at least, the scene was supposed to be brutal. Did anyone else find themselves totally unmoved by the scene? I feel like Daenerys’s love for her dragons is regularly insisted upon, but I personally needed more development to find that bond emotionally believable. That’s the second big good-bye Dany’s had to make that left me Stonehearted.

A more moving farewell, in my book, was the one we paid to Jojen Reed. Oh, Jojen, I barely understood what you were talking about half the time. But your sister loved you, and you loved her, and when those Pirates of the Caribbean skeletons came punching their way up through the snow and stabbed you all those times and then your sister had to cut your throat to keep a bunch of angry wights from eating you, or whatever it is wights do to people when they catch them, I got very, very sad. Given how many times Jojen insisted that Bran would have to push forward to … wherever he was going, Jojen’s death wasn’t actually a surprise. And the show did sweep past it pretty fast in its rush to get to the juicy fantasy revelation: not only the Child of the Forest, but a Gandalf of Bran’s very own. (Children of the Forest, you may or may not recall, belong in the grumpkins-and-snarks category of supernatural creatures that once roamed Westeros but haven’t been seen for eons. Apparently they have been spending the intervening years living underground and perfecting their cherry-bomb tricks.)

The Three-Eyed Raven, a.k.a. Fantasy 101 Old Wizard Man, tells Bran that he’s been watching all of them for all their lives with his thousand eyes (geez Dad, get off my back and just let me ). He also tells him that Jojen knew he would die, and did so in order for Bran do “find what he lost.” Bran asked – with what struck me as unseemly eagerness, given his friend’s very fresh demise – if the raven was going to teach him to walk. The old man replies that he will never walk again – but he will fly. Robin Arryn will be so sad to miss it!

It remains an open question, to me, what the show creators think of Bran continuing to warg into Hodor whenever he needs to use the man’s body as a weapon. There’s a little thrill that comes from watching Bran’s mind click into place in Hodor’s body, as if the boy and the big man are some kind of magic meat Gobot. And the show encourages this; it’s fun and satisfying to watch Hodor suddenly move with a precision and focus that he didn’t have a moment before. (Kudos to actor Kristian Nairn for pulling off that transition.) And in this case, Hodor was being beaten by the wights when Bran made the transition. But I also feel like the ease with which Bran is falling into this habit is part and parcel of how, in his slow transition into something of a grumpkin or a snark himself, Bran is pulling away from humanity.

Something similar is happening to Bran’s big sister, Arya. As the Stark children make their way in the world, their sweetness is being wrung out of them – they’re becoming ice queens, dudely kings, heartless wizards, and, oh yes, stone-cold killers. It’s like a very, very heavy Narnia fanfic.

As I watched Arya watch the Hound die, I thought, Arya has learned a lesson that I, as a viewer, haven’t managed yet. Which is: how to remember when someone has done something awful. Given the sheer number of complicated story lines in , it’s easy to forget who did what way back when. Add that to the show’s have-it-both-ways relationship to on-screen violence (you can indulge in it even as you deplore it), and its insistence that every character has shades of moral murk – so that even terrible people who murder little boys and maim single fathers can, on other days, be plausibly tender protectors – and it’s easy to just let it all go and have wildly incoherent reactions to a character. I’m sure I wasn’t the only viewer who was feeling a little soft toward the Hound there, at the end, and wanted Arya to not only put him out of his misery but share a Tender Moment with her Big Buddy. And even though I don’t always want to root for the hard new Arya (or rather, the hardness in the new Arya), I, for one, am glad the show didn’t indulge my mawkish bullshit. Because, well, it was mawkish bullshit and I have enough things to feel conflicted about on this show. And ultimately, ending the Hound’s story line on such a painfully complicated emotional note felt like a proper wrap-up of his story line. (Assuming he’s really dead, of course.)

I loved the interaction between Arya and Brienne, especially the way they shared stories about their fathers. Watching Arya slowly size up this other, older warrior woman, it was easy to imagine what Arya’s next road-trip buddy comedy might have looked like. But Arya is clearly past the point where she needs a father mother figure. And so she pulls out the coin Jaqen H’ghar gave her two seasons ago – the one that, along with the magic words “Valar Morghulis” (“All men must die”), will compel any man of Braavos to whisk her away to his home country – and gets herself passage on a ship. Braavos is the homeland of her beloved water dancing teacher, Syrio Forel, as well as the home of Jaqen H’ghar’s Faceless Men assassins (as well as the home of the Iron Bank – all of which must keep the Braavosi tourism board very busy). The final scene of the episode begins with Arya and her white horse galloping across a wide swath of green fields and ends with her sailing off into the wide ocean – it was a visually and emotionally expansive conclusion, particularly in an episode with so many scenes in caves, catacombs, and other dark, claustrophobic spaces. I’m not crazy about yet location for season five, but I think Arya abroad will be able to hold my attention better than Daenerys does.

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Okay okay, let’s get into the big season-ending twist.

The children of Tywin Lannister had some special Father’s Day for their Papa Bear. For their entire lives, Tywin has been impressing upon them the importance of family ties above all else. Well, in “The Children,” the siblings make good on Daddy’s advice – but instead of orienting themselves toward the light of their father, they turn to one another. Cersei, in a mother-bear rage, tells Tywin that she won’t marry Loras and be shipped off with him to Highgarden; she has to stay in King’s Landing to protect Tommen, her “last boy,” from the tug-of-war for his soul that will surely ensue if he’s left to Margaery and Tywin. (So I guess she’s retracting that nice mother-in-law bit from a few episodes ago?) Cersei reminds her father of how, at the end of the Battle of Blackwater, he came upon her in the throne room, holding Tommen in her lap and on the verge of giving him nightshade. Cersei will destroy what she loves to keep it safe. She “burns the house to the ground” by speaking the truth that Tywin has tried to stay blind to for all these years: that Joffrey, Myrcella, and Tommen are Jaime’s children, not Robert Baratheon’s. (Watch Tywin fiddle with his keys as Cersei storms off – the only nervous tic I remember seeing him exhibit in four seasons.)

Cersei then goes to Jaime to declare her “love” for him – though it felt more like something allegiance to me. The scene comes right on the heels of Cersei’s encounter with Tywin; at multiple points, she brings up their father and Tommen. She compares her father to her lover, saying she doesn’t choose Tywin, she chooses Jaime. Cersei’s father and son are in the room just as much as her brother is. This scene isn’t just about rekindling a past love; it’s also about shoring up a future ally in a time of crisis, just as Cersei once tried to do with Oberyn. The notion that Cersei has this renewed passion for Jaime just doesn’t make emotional sense to me – and yes, I realize that this may be a willfully resistant reading because I can’t write off the rape scene as a bit of character complexity or an unintended continuity error. By season five, maybe I’ll have forgotten more.

Jaime, meanwhile, caps off the fraternal bonding that’s been building for the last half of the season and frees his little brother from his dungeon, risking Father’s displeasure by sending him off on a ship, procured by Varys, to the Free Cities. But Tyrion, of course, takes a little detour first. And sadly, for him, he sees Shae in his father’s bed before he meets his intended target.

It’s sad for us, too. I don’t take offense at the idea that Tyrion killed Shae; their love had a terrible, inevitable arc that bent toward a dark end. But her death was little more than an amuse bouche before the real meal. And it only seemed to mean something in so far as it affected Tyrion – which is why the camera focuses on his teary, screwed-up face through the long moments in which she sputters and dies. His reactions, his feelings, are the real money shot here. Tywin dies but is dignified with speech; Shae, like Ros before her, is a barely clothed woman who dies without words. Did she betray him because he hurt her? Was she trying to survive in the only way she knew how? We’ll never know, and in the end, did it matter?

When Tyrion does finally confront Tywin and bristles at his father’s casual but barbed use of the word “whore,” I don’t get the sense that he shoots an arrow into him because he’s slagging his true love. It’s because “whore” is a reflection on Tyrion. It’s a term that cuckolds the younger man; it renders him foolish, unmanned. In the end, the figure of Shae and the shame she embodies is simply the last straw in the long, grinding battle between these two lions.

In , the drama of the parent and the child is the alpha and the omega; it’s the bedrock of everything else. “I am your son. I have always been your son,” Tyrion says to his father, just before he plants one more carefully loaded arrow into his father’s chest. Tyrion may have burned down his house and brought down his primal enemy. But as he sails off in that crate to the Free Cities, how free do you think he really is?

Well folks, thanks for letting me wade through Westeros with you all once again. It’s been a pleasure, even though you’re all so small I can’t even see you.

Before we part for another long winter, a few final questions and observations.

  • I’ll be damned if I can remember how Stannis knew to ride against the Free Folk. Did Melisandre see something in the fire? And speaking of the Red Priestess – note the way she and Jon locked eyes at Castle Black, during the funeral rites for the fallen Watchmen. Given her history with young, pretty bastards, could this be some juicy foreshadowing?
  • Did Jon build Ygritte’s pyre at the same weirwood tree where Bran and Co. met the Three-Eyed Raven? All weirwood trees have blood-red leaves, and apparently they are plentiful in the North, so maybe not. The scene continued last week’s motif of the spaces that surround Jon and Ygritte, which can either make intimacy possible or drive them apart: Outside the confines of Castle Black and his duty as a Night’s Watchman, in the protected, divine sphere of the weirwood tree, Jon can openly and properly mourn his love. The shot of Ygritte’s white face swallowed up by the dark of her hair, her furs, and the pyre operated like a spotlight, focusing our attention, and Jon’s, on the woman herself, not the wildling culture she came from.
  • The Clegane brothers do not seem destined to make it through their lives without getting horribly maimed. What do you think Qyburn is going to do the Mountain that will bring him back changed but not weakened?
  • Watching Brienne battle the Hound was a good reminder that She’s so regal and composed lately, it’s nice to be reminded of the rough side we first came to love her for.
  • Loved how calmly Varys just turned right back around and got on that ship with Tyrion’s box once he heard the bells tolling for Tywin. Nothing keeps a good Spider down.

[Update] Game of Thrones: The 11 Best Moments from Season 4 | game of thrones season 4 – POLLICELEE

eleventy billion year nine month wait for Season 5 begins.

Game of Thrones Season 4 is over and now thenine month wait for Season 5 begins.

By the end of the Season 4 finale, “The Children,” Dany had imprisoned her dragons, Stannis rescued The Wall from the wildlings with his army, Tyrion had murdered his dad and gotten smuggled off to “parts unknown,” and Arya valor morghulis’d her way onto a Braavos-bound ship. The world of the show had greatly changed. Other characters’ fates, however, were left to our imaginations…

The 11 most awesome moments from this past season!

Hunger Level: Every F***ing Chicken

Arya and The Hound started off the season with a hankering for some freshly roasted fowl. And what followed proved, beyond debate, that any time you can kill a horde of Lannister soldiers and eat all their food, it’s a win-win day in Westeros. Also, can “I eat your chickens!” be the new “I drink your milkshake!?”

Here’s the (NSFW) moment when The Hound went from good to great.

All Choked Up

Nothing like starting off the season with a huge, game-changing death. No sooner had Joffrey, the wretched King of the realm, married the impersonal, politically-arranged love of his life, than his life got taken from him in a satisfyingly violent, writhing manner.

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And so Joffrey died as he lived. Surrounded by dozens of people who hated his guts and often daydreamed about him meeting an untimely end. This celebration had long been dubbed “The Purple Wedding” by book fans. Because royalty is often associated with purple.

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As is the skin of an asphyxiated douchebag.

Oh…my…god…THAT FROCK IS FABULOUS!

Climate Change

In one of the coolest, coldest surprises from Season 4, we took a trek way north of “North of The Wall” – all the way into Six Flags Over Westeros. Where we saw something resembling a “supreme council” of White Walkers transforming one of Craster’s donated sons into one of their own with a tiny touch of icy magic.

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This was actually the first time any Game of Thrones fan, watcher or reader, had seen the White Walkers assembled. Or had been privy to their transformative powers. Or had seen that one horned Walker who may or may not not be their “king.” But one thing was clear. Their next stop needed to be IKEA. I’m all for open floor plans, but you just know a couple of those Brozen want to sit down. They’re just too afraid of Darth Fieri to speak up.

Still a better family story than Craster.

Fool For a Client

Tyrion got the rawest of raw deals this season when he was forced to stand trial for Joffrey’s murder – and then witness after witness betrayed him. By the end, he’d had all he could stomach and became powerless to stop himself from giving everyone in the Red Keep a wicked tongue-lashing. One that was long overdue and yet somehow also very ill-timed.

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“I wish I had enough poison for the whole pack of you,” he spit, pretty much condemning himself to die right there on the spot. Hot-headed? Sure. But also very cathartic. For both Tyrion and the viewer. The only thing that could have made it better was if he’d been screaming at George R. R. Martin himself.

“Double dumbass on you!”

Stark is the New Black

While Tyrion spent weeks in a dungeon, awaiting an ample amount of injustice, his child-bride Sansa was whisked away to The Eyrie where she became embroiled in yet more scheming drama. By the end though, it seemed like she’d finally learned how to play the game – lying to cover up Lysa’s murder and then getting all gussied up and descending the stone steps like the teen Lady Macbeth that Littlefinger always dreamed of.

The question remains though – “Who’s zoomin’ who?” Could Sansa wind up out-playing the best plotter in all the land? Or has she finally merely learned to embrace the insanity that is her life? Plus, is it possible to her to hate the player but love the game?

By the end of the Season 4 finale, “The Children,” Dany had imprisoned her dragons, Stannis rescued The Wall from the wildlings with his army, Tyrion had murdered his dad and gotten smuggled off to “parts unknown,” and Arya valor morghulis’d her way onto a Braavos-bound ship. The world of the show had greatly changed. Other characters’ fates, however, were left to our imaginations…So here’s the part where we look back and the expansive epicness that was Season 4 and pull out our favorite scenes. It started as a 10 List, then became a 20 List, and now has returned, humbly, to an 11 List. We know we left a lot out. Twas done in the name of brevity.The 11 most awesome moments from this past season!Arya and The Hound started off the season with a hankering for some freshly roasted fowl. And what followed proved, beyond debate, that any time you can kill a horde of Lannister soldiers and eat all their food, it’s a win-win day in Westeros. Also, can “I eat your chickens!” be the new “I drink your milkshake!?”Here’s the (NSFW) moment when The Hound went from good to great.Nothing like starting off the season with a huge, game-changing death. No sooner had Joffrey, the wretched King of the realm, married the impersonal, politically-arranged love of his life, than his life got taken from him in a satisfyingly violent, writhing manner.And so Joffrey died as he lived. Surrounded by dozens of people who hated his guts and often daydreamed about him meeting an untimely end. This celebration had long been dubbed “The Purple Wedding” by book fans. Because royalty is often associated with purple.As is the skin of an asphyxiated douchebag.In one of the coolest, coldest surprises from Season 4, we took a trek way north of “North of The Wall” – all the way into Six Flags Over Westeros. Where we saw something resembling a “supreme council” of White Walkers transforming one of Craster’s donated sons into one of their own with a tiny touch of icy magic.This was actually the first time any Game of Thrones fan, watcher or reader, had seen the White Walkers assembled. Or had been privy to their transformative powers. Or had seen that one horned Walker who may or may not not be their “king.” But one thing was clear. Their next stop needed to be IKEA. I’m all for open floor plans, but you just know a couple of those Brozen want to sit down. They’re just too afraid of Darth Fieri to speak up.Tyrion got the rawest of raw deals this season when he was forced to stand trial for Joffrey’s murder – and then witness after witness betrayed him. By the end, he’d had all he could stomach and became powerless to stop himself from giving everyone in the Red Keep a wicked tongue-lashing. One that was long overdue and yet somehow also very ill-timed.”I wish I had enough poison for the whole pack of you,” he spit, pretty much condemning himself to die right there on the spot. Hot-headed? Sure. But also very cathartic. For both Tyrion and the viewer. The only thing that could have made it better was if he’d been screaming at George R. R. Martin himself.While Tyrion spent weeks in a dungeon, awaiting an ample amount of injustice, his child-bride Sansa was whisked away to The Eyrie where she became embroiled in yet more scheming drama. By the end though, it seemed like she’d finally learned how to play the game – lying to cover up Lysa’s murder and then getting all gussied up and descending the stone steps like the teen Lady Macbeth that Littlefinger always dreamed of.The question remains though – “Who’s zoomin’ who?” Could Sansa wind up out-playing the best plotter in all the land? Or has she finally merely learned to embrace the insanity that is her life? Plus, is it possible to her to hate the player but love the game?

Daenerys, Arya, and patricide on Page 2…

Friendzone Level: F*** Off

Season 4 brought about the end of many Game of Thrones eras, but none as time-tested as Daenerys and Jorah. Jorah, who cozied up to Dany initially because he was a spy for King Robert. But who then quickly gave up the espionage gig when he found our that she was a gorgeous, fire-proof babe who could cause baby dragons to hatch out of long dormant, dead eggs.

His past caught up with him this season though when Tywin (in one of his final acts of scheming brilliance) sent a “long-delayed” pardon notice to Meereen and royally upended Jorah’s s***. In doing so, Tywin robbed Daenerys of her most trusted advisor – perhaps creating a few cracks in her dragonfire-forged armor.

For Jorah, it meant being angrily sent away from the woman he (not so) secretly loved. Banished from Dany’s entire time zone.

“You’re to see the dragons every other weekend.”

Head Games

In one of the best, most-charged fight scenes in the show’s history, Prince Oberyn Martell battled Ser Gregor Clegane for the right of “Tyrion not to die.” But Oberyn wasn’t only fighting for The Imp. He had an ulterior motive for hobbling The Mountain. One that caused him to take his eyes off the prize for a split second. And one that caused him to lose those eyes the very next split second.

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Ser Gregor squeezing Oberyn’s head to a juicy, explosive pulp was this year’s “upload unsuspecting non-book readers’ reactions to YouTube” moment. It wasn’t as devastating as the Red Wedding, but it definitely took people’s breath away. And it stood as mocking proof that revenge is never ever a guaranteed thing on Game of Thrones. No matter how strikingly close you get to it.

“Is it too late to say that the face is off limits?”

Swiggity Swag Here Comes Mag

Episode 9, “The Watchers on the Wall,” was filled with many crowd-pleasing moments. From soaring overhead shots to sweeping 360 panoramas. Death and destruction reigned supreme as Mance Rayder’s wildling warriors tried their best to scale The Wall and conquer the Night’s Watch. So what moment to choose? Ygritte’s death? Jon killing Styr with a hammer? That giant arrow harpooning that one dude up and over the other side of The Wall?

How about when Grenn, and the poor souls chosen to help hold the inner gate, started reciting their sacred oath while Mag the Mighty charged at them? That one, despite not knowing Grenn all that well as a character, gave us goosebumps. It’s easy to scoff at the Watch and their centuries-long pledge to protect the rest of the continent from dangers no one else seems to know or care about, but it’s moments like this one that make you sit up and swell with pride. Eff yeah! Honor!

“Tell ’em Large Marge sent ya!”

Custody Hearing

After the unrivaled awesomeness of Oberyn vs. The Mountain, most were pretty sure we’d never get another epic one-on-one battle on the show again. Not at that level. So what did EP/writers D.B. Weiss and David Benioff do? They decided to go off-book and top that battle within the next three episodes. And so Brienne vs. The Hound became not only the beef to beat, but it also stands as one of the best “changes from the books” the show’s ever done.

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The two of them savaged each other with swords, fists, and rocks. One groin shot was answered with another. And it took all Brienne had to overcome Sandor Clegane’s world-hating fury. And so, by knocking The Hound over a steep embankment, optimism triumphed over pessimism. For this one brief, fleeting moment. Too bad Arya was nowhere to be found once the dust settled. Speaking of…

Tickle fight!

The Koala Tea of Mercy

Man, Arya was so amazing this year. Most every scene between her and The Hound crackled with fierce wit and satisfying payoff. And we were so close to making Arya’s sanity-snap of a laugh a part of this list…

But then, in the finale, she gifted us with this look…

“I like the way you die, boy.”

That steely gaze tho.

While The Hound was doing his damnedest to egg her on. Trying to get her to kill him, like she’d promised she’d do last season. But Arya had not only learned from her mentor that the world was a cruel, unforgiving place, she’d learned that sometimes death by her hands wasn’t always the best revenge. And that, like so many other killers in the kingdom, she was fresh out of mercy.

Talk S***, Get Hit

At long last, Tyrion was granted freedom. Jaime and Varys had come to save the day and spirit him off to safety. But first things first. Tyrion felt the need to have one final heart-to-heart with his dear old dad. And, as luck would have it, he found his ferocious father in probably the most vulnerable place to find a guy – pants down, on the crapper.

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Tywin tried his best to patriarch his way out of the predicament, but it was to no avail. The last thing Tyrion wanted to hear was more bluster. And so – with a couple well-placed crossbow bolts – he laid his father to rest atop the royal commode. The “Iron Throne” Tywin truly deserved.

“I’ve come to kick ass and chew bubblegum. And they haven’t invented bubblegum.”

Daenerys, Arya, and patricide on Page 2…Season 4 brought about the end of many Game of Thrones eras, but none as time-tested as Daenerys and Jorah. Jorah, who cozied up to Dany initially because he was a spy for King Robert. But who then quickly gave up the espionage gig when he found our that she was a gorgeous, fire-proof babe who could cause baby dragons to hatch out of long dormant, dead eggs.His past caught up with him this season though when Tywin (in one of his final acts of scheming brilliance) sent a “long-delayed” pardon notice to Meereen and royally upended Jorah’s s***. In doing so, Tywin robbed Daenerys of her most trusted advisor – perhaps creating a few cracks in her dragonfire-forged armor.For Jorah, it meant being angrily sent away from the woman he (not so) secretly loved. Banished from Dany’s entire time zone.In one of the best, most-charged fight scenes in the show’s history, Prince Oberyn Martell battled Ser Gregor Clegane for the right of “Tyrion not to die.” But Oberyn wasn’t only fighting for The Imp. He had an ulterior motive for hobbling The Mountain. One that caused him to take his eyes off the prize for a split second. And one that caused him to lose those eyes the very next split second.Ser Gregor squeezing Oberyn’s head to a juicy, explosive pulp was this year’s “upload unsuspecting non-book readers’ reactions to YouTube” moment. It wasn’t as devastating as the Red Wedding, but it definitely took people’s breath away. And it stood as mocking proof that revenge is never ever a guaranteed thing on Game of Thrones. No matter how strikingly close you get to it.Episode 9, “The Watchers on the Wall,” was filled with many crowd-pleasing moments. From soaring overhead shots to sweeping 360 panoramas. Death and destruction reigned supreme as Mance Rayder’s wildling warriors tried their best to scale The Wall and conquer the Night’s Watch. So what moment to choose? Ygritte’s death? Jon killing Styr with a hammer? That giant arrow harpooning that one dude up and over the other side of The Wall?How about when Grenn, and the poor souls chosen to help hold the inner gate, started reciting their sacred oath while Mag the Mighty charged at them? That one, despite not knowing Grenn all that well as a character, gave us goosebumps. It’s easy to scoff at the Watch and their centuries-long pledge to protect the rest of the continent from dangers no one else seems to know or care about, but it’s moments like this one that make you sit up and swell with pride. Eff yeah! Honor!After the unrivaled awesomeness of Oberyn vs. The Mountain, most were pretty sure we’d never get another epic one-on-one battle on the show again. Not at that level. So what did EP/writers D.B. Weiss and David Benioff do? They decided to go off-book and top that battle within the next three episodes. And so Brienne vs. The Hound became not only the beef to beat, but it also stands as one of the best “changes from the books” the show’s ever done.The two of them savaged each other with swords, fists, and rocks. One groin shot was answered with another. And it took all Brienne had to overcome Sandor Clegane’s world-hating fury. And so, by knocking The Hound over a steep embankment, optimism triumphed over pessimism. For this one brief, fleeting moment. Too bad Arya was nowhere to be found once the dust settled. Speaking of…Man, Arya was so amazing this year. Most every scene between her and The Hound crackled with fierce wit and satisfying payoff. And we were so close to making Arya’s sanity-snap of a laugh a part of this list…But then, in the finale, she gifted us with this look…That steely gaze tho.While The Hound was doing his damnedest to egg her on. Trying to get her to kill him, like she’d promised she’d do last season. But Arya had not only learned from her mentor that the world was a cruel, unforgiving place, she’d learned that sometimes death by her hands wasn’t always the best revenge. And that, like so many other killers in the kingdom, she was fresh out of mercy.At long last, Tyrion was granted freedom. Jaime and Varys had come to save the day and spirit him off to safety. But first things first. Tyrion felt the need to have one final heart-to-heart with his dear old dad. And, as luck would have it, he found his ferocious father in probably the most vulnerable place to find a guy – pants down, on the crapper.Tywin tried his best to patriarch his way out of the predicament, but it was to no avail. The last thing Tyrion wanted to hear was more bluster. And so – with a couple well-placed crossbow bolts – he laid his father to rest atop the royal commode. The “Iron Throne” Tywin truly deserved.

Matt Fowler is a writer for IGN. Follow him on Twitter at

Matt Fowler is a writer for IGN. Follow him on Twitter at @TheMattFowler and Facebook at Facebook.com/Showrenity


GOW Mr.07: \”HQ và BOX không có cửa vào chung kết\” | Tâm điểm FFAC


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นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูเพิ่มเติม

GOW Mr.07: \

S4E1 Game of Thrones: Tywin and Jaime talks.


Scene from S4E1 Two Swords, Game of Thrones.
Enjoy!
­
Game of Thrones Jaime Tywin Season 4
S04E01 Game of Thrones Two Swords

S4E1 Game of Thrones: Tywin and Jaime talks.

\”The War is Not Won:\” Game of Thrones Season 4: Official Trailer (HBO)


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Game of Thrones Season 4 premieres April 6 at 9PM, only on HBO.
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\

Game of Thrones Season 4 Red Carpet Premiere


The Story:
I edited a comedy Game of Thrones fauxtrailer for YouTube a few months back, (Game of Hearts, found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST4LwbDOLi0\”). The project wouldn’t have been possible without the hard work of David Crow.
Thanks to the success of \”Game of Hearts,\” I received an invite to the exclusive red carpet season 4 premiere of Game of Thrones at New York City’s Lincoln Center!
Here are just some of the people I saw there.
Apologies to Emilia Clarke, I spelled her name wrong on the video.
Music by Ramin Djawadi
Thanks again to you all for your support!

Game of Thrones Season 4 Red Carpet Premiere

Opening Credits | Game of Thrones | Season 8 (HBO)


The final season of Game of Thrones airs Sundays at 9PM on HBO.

Opening Credits | Game of Thrones | Season 8 (HBO)

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูวิธีอื่นๆLeather

ขอบคุณที่รับชมกระทู้ครับ game of thrones season 4

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